Best Book Reviews of 2020 | Book News and Reviews | leiasdelights.com

Looking for good books to read? The latest best-sellers and book reviews from all of the world.

TOP NON-FICTION READS OF 2020 • Just Mercy, Bryan Stevenson A close up look …

2 min read

TOP NON-FICTION READS OF 2020

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

• Just Mercy, Bryan Stevenson ⚖️
A close up look at the unfairness of the criminal justice system through Bryan Stevenson’s cases servicing incarcerated folks on death row. The ending when he’s talking to an elderly woman about being a “stone catcher” still makes me cry.

• Know My Name, @chanel_miller 🖊
One of my favorite books ever. I still tear up when I think about this book and all Chanel Miller has done for survivors through her story, writings, and advocacy.

• Have Black Lives Ever Mattered?, Mumia Abu-Jamal ✊🏼
So glad I picked this up on a whim. An excellent book for anyone new to conversations around abolition, particularly around police.

• In The Dream House, @carmenmmachado 🏠
This memoir was so unique. Machado’s writing and reflections of an abusive queer relationship are haunting and unlike anything you’ve ever read.

• The Best We Could Do, @teabuoy 🇻🇳
A heart wrenching look at a Vietnamese immigrant family after the fall of South Vietnam in the 70s, from before Bui was born into her adulthood. This will definitely hit fellow immigrant kids right in the heart.

• Citizen Illegal, @_joseolivarez ✍🏽
Olivarez’s poetry resonated deeply with me. I could see myself, my joys, my traumas, in his words.

• The Good Immigrant, @nikeshshuklawriter @chimenesuleyman 📚
Another book that will take immigrants (and kids of immigrants) on an emotional roller coaster ride. With 26 pieces from 26 writers, there is a story for everyone.

• Are Prisons Obsolete?, Angela Y. Davis 🚫
Angela Davis took the topic of prison abolition – a topic that is terrifying and impossible to many – and makes it accessible. The amount of ground she covers appears daunting but read it is anything but. Would also recommend for anyone interested in learning more about abolition and what’s possible in a world beyond prisons.
.
.
.
.
.